Brazil Cerrado

Brazil Cerrado

12.0 oz

Lightly roasted to highlight natural peanut and milk chocolate flavor notes. From the Minas Gerais state in Brazil, this coffee has low acidity and a nutty aroma.

Regular price $18.25
Shipping included

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About

Red Barn Coffee

Red Barn Coffee Roasters is a family owned and operated specialty coffee roaster, retailer and wholesaler. Mark and Lisa Verrochi were pioneers in the specialty coffee industry in the Northeast after observing the Seattle coffee boom while Mark was stationed out west for the Navy. Their first roasting facility was in an authentic New England style barn on their rural property in Hopkinton, MA.

Red Barn Coffee offers high quality single origin varietals from around the globe, cold brewed iced coffee, a full line of Organic, Fair Trade, Direct Trade, and naturally flavored coffees. New in 2016, all Red Barn Cafes now offer Nitro Cold Brew - a traditional cold brew iced coffee, nitrogen-infused and served from a tap.

They now conduct their roasting operations in warehouse space in Upton, MA. Red Barn supports over 100 wholesale partners throughout New England, and operates 5 company-owned cafes--two of which serve lunch and offer a full catering service. Introduced in 2013, a growing licensing program supports local entrepreneurs who wish to open up a Red Barn cafe of their own, leveraging a brand trusted for quality.

About

Brazil

Coffee production in Brazil is responsible for about a third of all coffee in the world.

Brazil by far is the world's largest producer of coffee, a position the country has held for the last 150 years. Coffee plantations, covering some 27,000 km2 (10,000 sq mi), are mainly located in the southeastern states of Minas Gerais, São Paulo and Paraná where the environment and climate provide ideal growing conditions.

The crop first arrived in Brazil in the 18th century and the country had become the dominant producer by the 1840s. Production as a share of world production peaked in the 1920s, with the country supplying 80% of the world's coffee, but has declined since the 1950s due to increased global production.